Show Notes:

A backpack is one of the most important pieces of hunting gear you can buy, you will likely use it hunting all different types of game, with all different types of clothing, firearms, and footwear. A good pack can literally last half a lifetime and go with you many more places than just the woods. On today’s episode I talk about what are the top five things to look for in a good hunting backpack

Take Aways:

  1. Concealment. A good backpack must have reasonable concealment. It should be some combination of camouflage, black, brown, or tan. It needs to blend into the woods well during all seasons and not be something that ever gives you away.
  2. Compartments. The right hunting pack for you should fit your style with the right number and size of compartments. I recommend simple and easy, the fewer pockets you have, the fewer you have to search through in a tree, in the dark, or when every sound and movement matters. But make sure you have a place to easily access a water bottle.
  3. Comfort. The best backpack for you is one you can wear all day. It shouldn’t be too big or too heavy. It should have good padding on the straps and against your back. And there should be strap adjustments as well.
  4. Waterproofing. Ideally your pack will be water resistant or water proof. If it’s not, you need to have a water proof backup plan. I keep a big plastic garbage bag inside mine that I can quickly put the pack inside of when needed.
  5. Cost. When it comes to hunting packs, the sky is the limit for price. But you don’t have to spend hundreds of dollars for a quality pack. The pack that fits you best may not even be a name brand. Set yourself a budget you are comfortable with and find the pack that best meets the above criteria for you. 

Show Notes:

If you spend more than an hour in the woods, there is a good chance you will need a bathroom break. What you are hunting determines the best tactics for relieving yourself. On today’s episode I talk about how and when to use the restroom with the least chance of disrupting your hunt.

Take Aways:

  • Contrary to popular belief, deer are not put off by the scent you leave from relieving yourself, in fact they may find it curious. You are more likely to spook a deer by being seen or heard. So the best option is to go right from your tree stand if possible with minimal movement or noise.
  • Turkeys and most birds can’t really smell, so movement and sound are the only things to concern yourself with.
  • Small game gives you maybe the most flexibility, most of these game animals don’t care much.
  • Predators do care, and you have to play the wind. If the wind is on your side then you have minimal risk using the restroom, if the wind is against you then it can ruin your hunt.  
  • The rule of thumb is anytime you are going to leave an area, use the bathroom then, as opposed to whenever you come into a fresh area.

Show Notes:

When it comes to hunting, there is a ditch on either side of the road. On one side people cannot find enough time to hunt. On the other side, people get out of control and hunt so much that it hurts their family or job. On today’s episode I talk about how to balance hunting and life, and that includes how to make time to hunt as well as set up guardrails for yourself. 

Take Aways:

  • Schedule time off for hunting each year, plan how many days and in what seasons, this will make sure you do it.
  • Schedule a Saturday every month for hunting. Some months this means going into the woods to hunt, other months it means target practice and scouting.
  • Use more of your time off for your family than for hunting.  Make it a point to never let this balance shift towards hunting and away from family.
  • Always schedule and talk about hunting in advance, never be a no show at work.
  • Always be willing to blow off a planned hunting day for something that is more important. Never blow off something more important for hunting.
  • Put first things first, honor what is most important, and you will earn the respect and flexibility you need to hunt.

 

Show Notes:

This was not your average turkey hunt.  Nothing about it was like any hunt I’ve ever had. It was like box office drama unfolding in real time. There were ups, downs, near defeats, a glorious finale and a sudden twist at that end. That’s right, on this episode I recount the adventure of the gobbler I took this past week and am in the process of cooking as I type this.

Throughout the episode I explain some of the tactics and strategies that I used and why, I hope you take away a lot more than just the story. Which of course should be the aim of any really good story.


Show Notes:

Turkeys like all creatures are impacted by the weather, and with a little strategy you can improve your odds. On today’s episode I talk about all different types of weather and how they effect spring gobbler hunting.

Take Aways:

  • There is debate over what is best, sunny or cloudy. The bottom line is you should be in the woods for both!
  • Sunny and cloudy both impact concealment so you need to be mindful to adjust your approach for each.
  • Cold, crisp mornings, especially after an over all temperature drop seem to give a slight advantage over hot and muggy ones.
  • A little rain is ok, but pass if there is going to be a lot of rain, save your vacation days for clearer sky’s.
  • Turkeys will stay on the roost, bed down, or seek shelter if the weather is really bad, you should too!
  • Don’t trust the weatherman, spring weather if volatile. Do your own research and keep your finger on the pulse of the radar when things look questionable, you can lose a lot of nice days in the spring if you go with what the weather man tells you.
  • Wind is a major factor, it impacts your ability to hear turkey’s and lessens their ability to hear you.
  • If you are going to hunt in the wind, you will have to get closer and call louder, and adjust your overall strategy.
  • The weather is your friend, not your enemy. Use it to improve your odds by selecting days that are ideal and passing on days that questionable.
  • Tick spray is a good idea in the spring, especially if it’s warm. Apply liberally, scent control is not an issue with turkeys. Here is the spray I use.

Show Notes:

A turkey vest is not the type of gear that will make you a more successful hunting, but it can make you a more comfortable and a more organized hunter. On today’s episode I talk all about the features and benefits of turkey vests and my experience hunting with and without them.

Take Aways:

  • Turkey vests encourage you to pack light, travel light, and ultimately carry less gear which means it is less taxing to hunt.
  • They have lots of pockets specifically designed for the most common types of turkey calls.
  • The better vests are engineered so you can access your regular calls and seat with little to no noise. They can very much help stealth.
  • The ones worth buying have attached seats that flip down so you can setup anywhere and at any time.
  • Nice features to look for are a built in orange flag you can deploy, padded back, fabric covered magnets to hold things closed and keep things quieter, padded shoulder straps, and a game pouch for game birds (or water, sandwiches, umbrellas, or extra clothes.)
  • Here is the vest that I use, but it has been discontinued. You can find a similar one here. But don’t just buy one offline without trying it on and getting a feel for it in person.

Show Notes:

No matter how you prefer to hunt turkeys, it is good to have options for when things end up being different from the ideal situation. On this episode I cover several advanced strategies for hunting spring gobblers. These are not strategies I recommend you lead with, but they are extra tools in your toolbox to help you up your game.

Take Aways:

  • Roosting birds can be a great technique for hard to hunt gobblers, and/or when you have the time and knowledge of the landscape to keep tabs on where birds spend their time and where they fly up to sleep.
  • Moving and calling can be a good way to shake things up when a bird gets stuck. Moving a little further and playing hard to get can be a great approach, as can moving side-to-side and calling.
  • Decoys are often just as much liability as benefit, but in certain situations, like with picky toms, or outside of a blind at a fields edge they can be helpful for sealing the deal. Just make sure if you do get some, you get ones that really look like turkeys.
  • Out calling hens is an approach where you try to beat the other hens in the woods at their own game by sounding like an entire flock of turkeys yourself. It’s risky but it can be a way to win a distracted gobblers attention.
  • Ambush hunting involves using your knowledge of a toms habits or making the best use of the available terrain to out do a wary bird, or one that does not answer to any calls.

 

Show Notes:

Field dressing and preparing a turkey to cook is a fast and easy process, it is something that any beginner can do and there is lots of margin for error. On today’s episode I talk about the actual process, how you can overcome any “yuck” factor, and the best way for beginners to approach cleaning a turkey. You do not need any special tools or skills, once you’ve shot the turkey the hard part is over. 

Take Aways:

  • Field dressing a is a misnomer, you do not need to do anything to a turkey in the field under normal circumstances.
  • If it is very hot and you have a long way to go home, then you can remove the entrails, wash out the bird, and stuff it with ice. 
  • Normally you can just take the bird home and prepare it there.
  • It is popular to pluck a turkey and preserve the skin to cook it whole. That is a great approach, but beginners do not need to invest that kind of time unless you want to.
  • The fastest way is to skin a turkey, then quarter it, and cook each quarter for separate meal. With this approach, you don’t even need to remove the guts.
  • A turkey is just like a big chicken once you start to work on it, thinking about it like that can help you get past any yuck factor.
  • Keep the beard and the fan, and use some borax and/or salt to dry out the little bit of skin still attached. 
  • The beard is a nice trophy. The fan is also a good trophy and it’s something you can use to decorate future decoys.
  • If you are a beginner then you do not need to keep the ends of the wings with the feathers, but some expert hunters do keep these to use for simulating turkey fly down sounds in the woods.

Field Dressing Videos:

Show Notes:

So much has been said and written about the best turkey hunting guns and shells that it can dizzy the head of anyone who hasn’t spent dozens of hours researching and experimenting.  On today’s episode I simplify things and focus in on the best shotguns and loads for beginners. You shouldn’t need a degree in turkey hunting firearms to get started with the sport, it’s a lot easier than most people make it sound.

Take Aways:

  • The best shotgun for turkey hunting is the one you can shoot the best. It doesn’t matter if it’s a 410 or a 10 gauge, what you are the most comfortable and most consistent with is the gun you should use.
  • The best place to start is with the shotgun you already have. Get into the woods and get some experience, that experience will guide you towards the shotgun that fits you best. Research cannot beat experience.
  • If you need to buy something, the best shotgun is a the most cost effective used one you can find. Again, get started, and get experience. If you can find something for $100, get that and get started.
  • Tried and true, cost effective, and mass produced pump shotguns are the Mossberg 500 and the Remington 870. You cannot go wrong with either.
  • If you want a semi-automatic, I recommend the Mossberg 930. It’s cheap, easy to operate, rugged, and I’ve had 100% reliability. And no, Mossberg is not a sponsor of this podcast. 
  • If you have a choice between a wood stock and synthetic stock, get the synthetic. It takes less maintenance, it is more rugged, and you won’t feel bad about scratching it. If you want a show gun or a target gun get wood. If you are a new hunter, plastic makes your life easier.
  • You want a full choke for any shotgun you get. Extra full, or extra extra full can be helpful but you don’t need them to get started. They only provide incremental benefit over a regular full choke anyway.
  • Ideal turkey hunting distance is 25-35 yards. Practice for that, get gear for that.
  • It is very easy to underestimate range, if you practice for 50 yard shots you are likely to take 70 yard shots where there is almost no chance for success.
  • Get a 12 gauge shotgun, between target loads and magnum loads you will find shells that are a good fit for you, whether you need light recoil or want high power.
  • You want #6, #7, or #8 shot.  Bigger shot (smaller numbers) means there are fewer pellets in each shell, which means you have fewer chances to hit a turkey’s vitals.
  • Regular, cheap, #7.5 target loads of 2 3/4″ is all you need. Some of the most seasoned turkey hunters on the planet shoot that. And at 35 yards, it’s great.
  • If you want to go bigger, then #6 express loads that are 3″ are the biggest, most powerful that you need.
  • Do not pay more than $1 per shell, you do not need anything more expensive to get started.
  • More powerful shells create more recoil and more noise which means most hunters do not shoot them as accurately, consistently, or enjoyably. The benefits they provide are not worth trade off.
  • You want a shotgun that you can shoot effectively and enjoyably, with affordable shells that use small shot, while hunting at reasonable distances. 
  • Now get into the woods!

 

Show Notes:

Spring turkey hunting is an adrenaline filled game of skill and quick decisions. One thing every new hunter must have to play the game is a turkey call, and preferably more than one. On today’s episode I help you parse through the endless variety of turkey calls to settle on the best two options for new hunters. 

Take Aways:

  • The more common types of calls include box calls, mouth calls, pot calls, push-pull calls, and wing bone calls. Each has a use and can be the right call in a particular circumstance.
  • Each call is an instrument, some take more practice to get proficient with, and some can do things others can’t. 
  • It is best to have at least two calls with you because not all birds will respond to every call, and some sounds are easier to make on certain calls.
  • I recommend you start by getting a couple cheap calls, after you get your feet wet you will then be able to decide what you like and what fits your style and you can invest in better calls then. 
  • The best call for beginners is the box call, I think it is the easiest call to make high quality turkey sounds at ideal volume levels.
  • The second best call for beginners is the pot call. These come in slate, glass, crystal, aluminum, and probably more.
    • The simple slate is the cheapest and easiest for beginners to make a good turkey sound with. Here is a beginners Slate Call
  • The third best call for beginners is the push-pull call. This is the easiest call to make turkey sounds with by far.
    • But often the volume isn’t high enough to reach birds that are far off and there is really no way to make it quieter or louder. That is the only real downside, without that one drawback this would be number one.
    • But for some people, this may be a better fit for your first call. Here is an example of a beginners Push-Pull Call
  • A mouth call is perhaps the most difficult to master and I recommend beginners do not even touch one unless or until you get some real hunting experience and decide to pursue the sport.

 

Box Call Example Videos

 

Slate Call Example Videos

 

Push-Pull Call Example