Show Notes:

Coyotes have super powers when it comes to their sense of smell and there is no way to go head-to-head with them in that area and win. On today’s episode I talk about how to overcome their greatest advantage. 

Take Aways:

  • Coyotes sense of sight is not better than yours, at least not in daylight. You can see more colors and with more clarity.
  • Coyotes sense of hearing is good but it is overridden by their sense of smell.
  • Coyotes can smell many times better than humans, and they have sense of smell super powers that go beyond sensitivity.
  • Learn more and what to do on this episode. 

Show Notes:

Not all coyotes are created the same, and not all are in the same stage of life. On this episode I talk about the three main types of coyotes and the tactics you can use to hunt them.

Take Aways:

    • Home Range Coyotes. These animals that have made their home in a specific range. They will mark it, patrol it, defend it, and hunt for food there. Learn how to hunt them by listening in.
    • Dispersing Coyotes. These younger coyotes are being pushed out of an area by the alphas because there isn’t enough room or food for all of them. They are looking for a new home.
    • Transient Coyotes. These savvy lone dogs never settle down and are constantly on the move. They are ever looking for new places.

Show Notes:

Bait can be a powerful tool for coyote hunting and other predators when used right, but it can be a liability when used wrong. On this episode I talk about whether you can hunt predators with bait, whether you should, and how you can get started.

Take Aways:

  • Can you hunt coyotes with bait? In many states yes, it is totally legal. Be sure to check your local laws.
  • Should you hunt them with bait? Philosophically, usually. When it comes to safety, that depends on where you live, listen to learn more.
  • How can you start hunting with bait? This all boils down to what should you use for bait, where do you put it, and when should you place it there.

Show Notes:

Pheasant hunting takes much less specialized gear than many other types of hunting. On this episode I talk about the basic guns and gear you need to get started hunting pheasants.

Take Aways:

  • The most important thing to keep in mind is staying light on your feet. You will be covering a lot of ground and the more you carry and wear the harder it will be.
  • When it comes to shotguns, the best gun to start with is usually the one you already own.
  • Before you start shelling out cash for guns and gear, get into the woods and get some experience to find out what features you value.
  • Its easy to wrap up deer season and want to overdress for late season pheasant, but because you are moving so much it is very easy to stay warm. Take extra layers you can add if you get cold.
  • Wear orange even if you don’t have to, people are crazy, staying safe is paramount.

Show Notes:

Pheasant hunting is a great active style of hunting, it is unique, fast paced, and high energy. On this episode I talk about three strategies to get you started hunting pheasants.

Take Aways:

  • Hunting with Dogs. This is the easiest and most common way to hunt pheasants. A good bird dog can make all the difference in the world.
  • Hunting as a Team Without Dogs. No dog? No problem. A small group of hunters can do a great job flushing birds.
  • Solo Hunting. Most new hunters are likely to be on their own and this is the more difficult way to hunt, but it can be done and it can be fun. I spend some extra time going into solo hunting techniques on this episode.

 

 

Show Notes:

There can be excellent opportunities to turn a deer hunt into a coyote hunt if you think outside of the box and take some basic principles into consideration. On this episode I talk about 3 ways to maximize your time and effort in the woods.

Take Aways:

  • If coyotes are in the area or menacing an area you can convert any deer hunt to a coyote hunt.
  • Be mindful of your hunting plans, converting a deer hunt to a coyote hunt is best done if you do not plan to hunt deer in that area again in the near future. 
  • There is one tactic you can use to literally draw in deer and coyotes at the same time, and take whoever shows up first.
  • Always be mindful of your blaze orange regulations, many places require you to wear orange to hunt coyotes if it is during a particular deer season.

Show Notes:

If you hunt long enough you will find or may be a person who does not like the taste of some or all game. On this episode I talk about the top four reasons people do not like the taste of game and what you can do to change that.

Take Aways:

  • Venison may be the most common game meat available so more people will have tried it and formed an opinion, but these principles apply to all types of game.
  • Nothing says people need to like game, but I’ve found it can be something that enriches the lives of those who appreciate it.
  • There are good reasons why someone may not like the taste of game, some are very valid, and all but one can be changed.
  • Many people had a bad first impression and have never had a second impression. Or they have formed an opinion with no experience. In both cases there is hope.
  • Most of the time people’s opinion is based on poor quality meat or poor cooking. Here are two previous episodes that can make all the difference in these departments.
  • You must remember that most children left to themselves will grow up unwilling to eat anything other than pizza, chicken nuggets, and mac & cheese. 
    • It shouldn’t be surprising when adults become so used to a small rotation of food options that they find something different undesirable. But even that does not mean they actually do not like game. They may just have some growing to do before they can appreciate it.

 

Show Notes:

Once the rut is over deer behavior begins to change and so do hunting conditions. On this episode I talk about what tactics you can use to be successful at late season deer hunting.

Take Aways:

  • After the rut, bucks go back to their home range and does settle down.
  • Fewer hunters are in the woods when winter begins so hunting pressure begins to diminish.
  • The woods have less food, less cover, and less water for deer.
  • Deer are taking less chances and covering less ground.
  • All day sits are not necessary in winter and can actually be counter productive.
  • When you take all of these and more factors into account, there are some great strategies for late season hunting. Listen to this episode to hear them.

 

Show Notes:

Butchering a whole deer from field to freezer is a big undertaking for new hunters and we don’t recommend trying it your first time. But if you know what to ask your butcher for, and if you are able to cut up your own leg quarters that they prep and return to you, you can enjoy a level of quality and cooking that few hunters experience. On this episode I talk about butchering a leg quarter and how to cook each cut of meat.

Take Aways:

  • All you need to butcher your own leg quarts is a sharp knife and a cutting board. That’s it. Watch the videos below, it’s super easy.
  • When someone asked Chef Wutsch about the best type, brand, and style of knife to use, his answer was “a sharp one”.  Really, that’s all that matters.
  • Most butchers take short cuts and just chop up all the prime leg sections so you will never be able to cook each muscle in it’s ideal way.
  • The front legs are less exciting from a culinary standpoint and have less meat, your butcher can easily turn those into stew meat and ground and you can save a little time. 
  • I recommend handling the back legs and the back straps yourself.
  • Just like beef, elk, lamb, and moose, each deer leg quarter contains:
    • Shank – The most tough but most flavorful cut, braise this for 4 hours with the right seasonings and you will be amazed. But if you grill it, it may be inedible.
    • Top Round – The most tender cut of the leg, this makes great steaks.
    • Bottom Round – Very lean, but not as tender. Perfect for a roast, pot roast, or jerky. If you grill it, treat it like a flank steak, cook it to medium rare and cut very thin across the grain.
    • Eye of Round – A small, lean, semi-tender cut. Great for medallions, or searing and serving.
    • Sirloin Tip – A football shaped, less tender cut that is ideal for roasts and pot roasts. Cook it low and slow and it’s perfect.


Show Notes:

The taste of venison can vary a lot of from deer to deer. The more you know about what impacts the flavor of your meat, the more steps you can take to ensure the most tender and flavorful venison possible. On today’s episode I talk about seven factors that impact the taste of your meat.

Take Aways:

  • Most of this is not unique to venison, it effects beef as well. But beef is raised, slaughtered, butchered, and sold like clockwork in a well tuned and managed system that ensures quality and flavor. When it comes to deer, many of the flavor effecting factors are in your hands.
  • What happens between the hour before you pull the trigger until when the meat enters the freezer makes all the difference. Even the most skilled cooking cannot set right things that were done poorly in the field.
  • Cooking certainly does make a difference though…
  • Venison is not beef, you cannot treat it just like beef and expect to get the same results. It must be cooked differently with different recipes and methods.
  • Venison can taste better than beef, but the measure of “good” is not how much it tastes like beef. Venison is unique, distinct, and should be enjoyed as such.
  • You should not need to soak your meat in milk, vinegar, or anything else before cooking it. That should only be a last resort for if it was mismanaged in the field.
  • Listen to the episode for the seven factors that impact flavor.