Show Notes:

Up until recently every hunter using a firearm had to make a decision with every hunt. Do they protect their future or relish the present? Tetra Hearing has changed the game for all hunters when it comes to saving their hearing and enjoying every precious sound of every hunt and game species. Whether you are hunting ducks, geese, turkeys, deer, pheasants, grouse, crows, doves, elk, or anything else the Tetra AlphaShield & Multi-Pursuit hearing devices can not only save your hearing but help you hear better and hunt better.  I make no commissions on this product and there are no affiliate links. These are my own opinions and this my very own detailed and passionate review.  This may be the most important podcast episode I have ever done. Please listen to this episode.

Pros:

  • Allows you to hear everything around you with crisp clarity.
  • Audio quality is exceptional, no static, hum, ambient sounds, distractions, etc.
  • Can be custom tuned to your actual personal hearing levels for each ear.
  • Instantly blocks out the sound of gun fire and loud calling to protect your hearing.
    • These are designed to both stop the incremental hearing loss that comes from infrequent shooting with the average deer and turkey seasons as well as stop the accelerated hearing loss caused by high volume shooting seen in hunting waterfowl, pheasants, doves, crows, etc. 
  • Utilizes advanced audio processing technology to filter out various sounds you do not want to hear but more clearly capture subtle sounds you do want to hear.
  • Filters out the majority of wind noise.
  • Amplifies the unique sounds of the game animals you are hunting like turkey gobbles and yelps, duck quacks and wing beats, deer grunts and footfalls, pheasants flushing, and much more. 
  • Far better than anything I’ve seen on the market. In my mind they have no competitors, no one else offering similar products is even in their league. 
  • Fits snugly in your ear and will not fall out.
  • Works great while wearing a hat, beanie, whole head facemask, camo head shroud, etc.
  • Can be put on in seconds.
  • Reduces flinching causes by loud muzzle blast and may help some hunters shoot more accurately.
  • Uses long lasting disposable hearing aid batteries you can easily and inexpensively get in bulk.
  • Super simple to use, there is almost no way to do it wrong. Before long you can easily put them on in the dark without effort or thought.
  • Is sensitive enough to pick up the faintest whisper and the wing beats of ducks but instantly blocks out the roar of magnum shotgun shells.
  • Can be programmed for the game animals that you personally hunt.
  • Improves your hearing so well that even archery hunters may want to use them to hear game more clearly from further away.
  • Designed by ear doctors and hunters, does its job with outstanding excellence. 
    • It is as if they thought of every intricate detail but put it in a package with unexplainable simplicity. 
  • Utilizes high grade hearing aid technology meant to be used constantly, reliably, and without down time. 
  • Comes with 6 different size tips to accommodate different ear sizes.
  • Tetra has confirmed that people with Health Saving Accounts (HSA) can use those funds towards purchasing their products.

Cons:

  • They fit too tightly for my small ears at first. They felt acceptably snug after a few outings. But after a few half day hunts they fit comfortably enough that I would forget I was wearing them. I’d rather them fit perfectly from day one, but this is still preferred over being too loose.
    • Some people with small ears may not wear them enough to find out that their ears will adapt to them and they become comfortable over time.
  • Sounds weird indoors and around town. But they are meant to be used in the field and they do thrive in their intended environment.
  • The battery door feels a little delicate when open. Should be fine, but be careful to take it is easy when changing batteries. 
  • Price. No two ways about it, they are expensive. Costing as much as a firearm makes them a significant purchase. A very well worth it purchase, but not something most people can casually buy without saving up. 
    • They do go on sale occasionally. And Tetra has said they are working on sourcing more cost effective components to lower the prices.

Final Analysis: Every hunter using a firearm should get these, especially those hunting game requiring regular and frequent shooting like waterfowl, pheasants, doves, etc. If you are a new hunter it would be better to hunt another season or two with a less than thrilling firearm and buy these before upgrading your gun. Everyone should put these on their vision list and prioritize them as they are financially able. 

Learn more at www.TetraHearing.com

Show Notes:

Calling predators takes a measure of skill and discipline no matter what tool you use. Electronic calls can be an easier path to success but manual calls do have some benefits that are exclusive to them. On this episode I talk about not just picking the best type of call but how you can up your game when it comes to calling coyotes, foxes, and more.

Electronic Calls:

  • Are way easier to start with
  • Are fast and easy to use
  • Save your lungs and energy
  • Have a massive variety of sounds you can use
  • Are more expensive
  • Require batteries
  • Are only semi-weather resistant

Manual Calls:

  • Are harder to learn
  • Take time and practice to master
  • Require much more energy and focus to use
  • Are small and easy to transport
  • Have no batteries or electronics to mess up
  • Are dynamic and flexible
  • Add realistic variation to your calling

 

Show Notes:

Coyotes have super powers when it comes to their sense of smell and there is no way to go head-to-head with them in that area and win. On today’s episode I talk about how to overcome their greatest advantage. 

Take Aways:

  • Coyotes sense of sight is not better than yours, at least not in daylight. You can see more colors and with more clarity.
  • Coyotes sense of hearing is good but it is overridden by their sense of smell.
  • Coyotes can smell many times better than humans, and they have sense of smell super powers that go beyond sensitivity.
  • Learn more and what to do on this episode. 

Show Notes:

Not all coyotes are created the same, and not all are in the same stage of life. On this episode I talk about the three main types of coyotes and the tactics you can use to hunt them.

Take Aways:

    • Home Range Coyotes. These animals that have made their home in a specific range. They will mark it, patrol it, defend it, and hunt for food there. Learn how to hunt them by listening in.
    • Dispersing Coyotes. These younger coyotes are being pushed out of an area by the alphas because there isn’t enough room or food for all of them. They are looking for a new home.
    • Transient Coyotes. These savvy lone dogs never settle down and are constantly on the move. They are ever looking for new places.

Show Notes:

Bait can be a powerful tool for coyote hunting and other predators when used right, but it can be a liability when used wrong. On this episode I talk about whether you can hunt predators with bait, whether you should, and how you can get started.

Take Aways:

  • Can you hunt coyotes with bait? In many states yes, it is totally legal. Be sure to check your local laws.
  • Should you hunt them with bait? Philosophically, usually. When it comes to safety, that depends on where you live, listen to learn more.
  • How can you start hunting with bait? This all boils down to what should you use for bait, where do you put it, and when should you place it there.

Show Notes:

There can be excellent opportunities to turn a deer hunt into a coyote hunt if you think outside of the box and take some basic principles into consideration. On this episode I talk about 3 ways to maximize your time and effort in the woods.

Take Aways:

  • If coyotes are in the area or menacing an area you can convert any deer hunt to a coyote hunt.
  • Be mindful of your hunting plans, converting a deer hunt to a coyote hunt is best done if you do not plan to hunt deer in that area again in the near future. 
  • There is one tactic you can use to literally draw in deer and coyotes at the same time, and take whoever shows up first.
  • Always be mindful of your blaze orange regulations, many places require you to wear orange to hunt coyotes if it is during a particular deer season.

Show Notes:

Coyotes, foxes, bobcats, and other predators have a very different post kill scenario than a deer, turkey, or other game that you would eat. The term “field dressing” a coyote is synonymous with skinning the animal so you can save or sell the hide. On today’s episode I talk about what you do with a coyote or fox once the animal is down and help you decide which approach is best for you.

Take Aways:

  • Do not eat predators, except in survival situations. It’s not about taste as much as it is not a healthy practice.
  • Unlike deer, you are not removing the organs, in fact you are not even cutting into the body cavity. 
  • A professional with the right tools can skin a coyote in 3 minutes, it will take a beginner much longer, but it is not a process that should be intimidating. 
  • Every depends on what you plan to do with the animal:
    • Mount the hide
    • Keep the hide
    • Keep the tail
    • Sell the whole animal
    • Sell the raw fur
    • Dry, tan, and sell the fur
    • Donate the animal to a fur trader
    • Keep a photo and discard the animal
  • Coyotes are considered pests in much of the U.S. which means it is acceptable to take a photo and discard the carcass.  But I recommend keeping the hide or part of it, as a trophy, especially for your first couple kills. 
  • In part of the country there are fur traders who will buy the animals whole, but they will pay much less than for a complete and tanned hide. Look for these if you are considering discarding the animal as a pest.
    • If nothing else, find a trapper to give the animal to. You could help them out and possibly gain some favors down the road.

Field Dressing / Skinning Videos:

 

 

 

 

Show Notes:

When it comes to hunting foxes, coyotes, bobcats, etc. at night, your flashlight is the piece of gear that makes the hunt possible. If you can’t see you can’t shoot. So having a good light is critically important. Having a bad light can make the adventure more challenging than it’s worth. On this episode I cover everything you need to know about predator hunting flashlights.

Take Aways:

  • The only good color for predator hunting lights is red.  There is no other option. Green is workable to get started if you already have one, but do not spend money on any color but red.
  • The light MUST have a red LED. There is no other option. A red filter over a white LED is going to suck away your range and brightness. If you already have a white light with a red filter, you can start with that to get your feet wet but ONLY buy a red LED light.
  • You want to have more light range than you think you need. A good minimum is 400-500 yards.  
  • The light is hardly visible at its max range. A 500 yard light will only give you reasonable illumination at 300-400 yards, and may only be bright enough to distinguish between animals at 200 yards, which is already shooting range.
  • If you have even a fair scope, you can see through it just fine using a red light to illuminate your target. No need to buy a special scope to get started  predator hunting at night. 
  • You want to buy a light with changeable LEDs so you can use a white LED, a green one, and a UV bulb in addition to your red bulb, this makes the light versatile so it can be used for searching, tracking wounded game, hog hunting, or anything else you would want a powerful light for. It also helps you get the most out of your investment.
  • Re-chargeable batteries are a must, this is a non-negotiable. 
  • I use and recommend Sniper Hawg Lights, here you can see that the 66LR will throw red light over 700 yards, and the light packages are here.

Show Notes:

Hunting coyotes and foxes can be done more comfortably and effectively with the right gear. However, depending on how you hunt them, you can start with very basic equipment and then work your way up as you get deeper into the sport. In this episode I cover the simplest level of gear you can use and then what would be ideal for the new hunter to use. Everything we talk about on this episode centers around the strategy of hunting predators at night.

Take Aways:

  • You can start predator hunting with almost anything that is warm enough for the weather as long as it’s dark colored. Black is best, but dark greens and grays would work as well. 
  • Its important to match footgear to the weather and terrain. Because you won’t be sitting for much more than an hour, you can get away with less footgear than say for deer hunting.
  • Hand and foot warms can be a lot of help, especially if you are dressing light!
  • Ideal attire for night hunting is full camo with gloves, hat, and a face covering, but your flashlight handling will play the biggest role and how well you can stay hidden.
  • You do not need to have a heavy pack for hunting foxes, coyotes, bobcats, etc.  The basics include a search flashlight, a head lamp, a knife, rubber gloves, some paper towers, plastic bag, and whatever tags might be needed in your area.
  • Look for clothing and footwear that is quite above all.
  • Noise and scent matter more than having perfect gear. Practice stealth for the best results!
 

 

Show Notes:

When it comes to hunting coyotes, foxes, bobcats, or larger predators, you a rifle that does a handful of very specific things.  Any rifle can work, but there may be downsides.  On this episode I talk in-depth about what attributes you want in a rifle, what chamberings are most effective, and what a new hunter should be looking for in a gun for predator hunting. My recommendations might surprise you. 

Take Aways:

  • Any gun can be used, from a shotgun to a magnum rifle, and if that is what you have, then start there to see if you enjoy the sport and want to invest more in it. 
  • Predator hunting rifles should fire a small bullet, at high speed, that is very accurate at long range. 
  • You want a round with minimal bullet drop, that will kill the animal quickly and humanely, without doing excessive damage to the fur.
  • Your benchmark distance should be 200 yards. You want to practice for that range and have the equipment to effectively take game at that range. Your ability and environment may call for longer or shorter shots, but this is where to start.
  • Adjustable trigger, longer barrel, and 4-12x or better scope are major features you want to have.
  • The smallest effective round for coyotes is 22 magnum at short range, it is not viable at long range. 
  • The largest advisable round is .243 Winchester which is a little bit too large but is a versatile rifle that can be used for deer as well. Larger rifles are fine for pest control but not for preserving the quality and value of the fur.
  • Three of the major ideal rounds are the .223, the 22-250, and the 204 Ruger
  • My recommendation for new hunters, is hands down the .223 for many reasons stated in the episode. The other calibers may be used more effectively by a master, but most hunters will not have the skill or environment to make use of any additional benefit they provide.
  • Savage makes Model 11’s and Model 10’s in various configurations that are ideal for the new hunter, as does Ruger with their American rifle line. Expect to spend between $400 and $600 for a new rifle with scope already mounted depending on what sales and deals you can find. 
  • Only buy a package deal if the scope comes with it’s own warrantee
  • New hunters should seriously consider getting a used rifle to save money. Which is one of the reasons for the .223 recommendation, there are many more of these guns out there.