Show Notes:

People tend to assert their opinions or feelings as the reason why hunting is ok or not ok. But what does the Bible have to say about it? On this episode I answer that question and touch on a number of related subjects.

On this episode I talk about what the Bible has to say about:

  • Eating meat in the beginning, historically, and today
  • Hunting in general
  • Hunting for food
  • Hunting for self defense
  • Hunting to protect property
  • Hunting for sport
  • Hunting ethics
  • Hunting tips and instructions
  • The game commission

Here are some of the scriptures that I mentioned on the episode:

Genesis 1:28
Then God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply; fill the earth and subdue it; have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over every living thing that moves on the earth.”

Genesis 2:15
Then the LORD God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to tend and keep it.

Genesis 9:3-6
Every moving thing that lives shall be food for you. I have given you all things, even as the green herbs. But you shall not eat flesh with its life, that is, its blood. Surely for your lifeblood I will demand a reckoning; from the hand of every beast I will require it, and from the hand of man. From the hand of every man’s brother I will require the life of man. “Whoever sheds man’s blood, By man his blood shall be shed; For in the image of God He made man.”

Genesis 25:27
So the boys grew. And Esau was a skillful hunter, a man of the field; but Jacob was a mild man, dwelling in tents.

Leviticus 17:13
“Whatever man of the children of Israel, or of the strangers who dwell among you, who hunts and catches any animal or bird that may be eaten, he shall pour out its blood and cover it with dust;

Proverbs 12:27
The lazy man does not roast what he took in hunting,
But diligence is man’s precious possession.

Deuteronomy 7:22
And the LORD your God will drive out those nations before you little by little; you will be unable to destroy them at once, lest the beasts of the field become too numerous for you.

Show Notes:

Is there a most important hunting tip that translates to all types and styles of hunting? Yes, absolutely.  On this episode I talk about the single most important lesson I’ve learned about hunting and that is developing mental and positional readiness.

Take Aways:

  • Mental readiness is having decided ahead of time what game you are going to take a shot at, what range you are comfortable shooting to, and the angles and scenarios you will pull the trigger in. 
  • Mental readiness enables you to operate within the critical two second rule.
  • Positional readiness is having your bow or firearm in a ready position with both hands always in their places so that you can bring the weapon to bare with just one pivot point. 
  • Positional readiness also enables you to operate within the two second rule.
  • Material readiness is having the right tools and gear to operate within the two second rule without making too much noise or having too much movement. Such as having a quiet and tight enough coat, etc. 
  • Material readiness also involves keeping you comfortable enough to maintain positional readiness.  Such as having warm enough gloves, etc.
  • The two second rule is a philosophy of hunting where you cannot count on having more than two seconds to make a decision to shoot, shoulder your weapon, and take the shoot. More time is a luxury that you must not depend on.
  • The two second rule is not about practicing fast target acquisition and trigger pulling, it is about maintaining mental and positional readiness.
  • You do not need to do speed drills at the shooting range, you need to be strategic in how you hunt.
  • Sometimes you should move very slowly and maybe take 10 seconds to shoulder your weapon, it is not just about fast movement but deliberate, efficient, and undetected movement

Show Notes:

What you eat and drink matters a lot for hunting, and so does when you eat and drink it. On this episode I talk about what I have learned to be the best eating and drinking habits prior to hunting and even while you are in the woods.

Take Aways:

  • Nothing is more important than knowing how different foods effect your body.
  • If dairy causes you problems, don’t eat it before going hunting.
  • If bacon or sausage will put you in the bathroom before the end of the morning, don’t eat it before hunting!
  • The type of hunting matters a lot. Sitting requires less food and drinking, and the downside of eating and drinking is larger.
  • Moving and hunting requires more of both, and there is much less if any downside to eating and drinking if you are moving a lot.
  • Few things are as disruptive when hunting than getting up to go to the bathroom or unwrapping a few granola bars.
  • Everything about your eating and drinking strategy should be focused on making you a more effective hunter.
  • You want to maximize comfort and stealth in the field. 
  • If you are hunting in a hard walled blind from 200 yards then you can get away with a lot more than someone hunting game within 50 yards of a tree strand.

Show Notes:

Are AR style rifles good for hunting? Should you hunt with one? Should new hunters use one? This is a hotly debated topic where opinions tend to overshadow facts. On this episode I talk about the pros and the cons without ranting or raving about either position.

Take Aways:

  • I cover both AR-15 rifles and AR-10 rifles because they are the most common.
  • I am familiar with the term “modern sporting rifle” but I’ve opted not to use it in this episode. It is not because I dislike the term but only a percentage of listeners would be familiar with it, so I’ve gone with the more familiar terms. No hate mail please.
  • Are there good reasons to hunt with an AR? Yes.
  • Are there good reason not to hunt with an AR? Yes.
  • Should you hunt with one? Maybe. You need to examine the pros and cons and YOUR situation to answer that question for yourself.
  • The answer an experienced hunter comes to and the answer a beginner comes to may be different however.
  • This episode is not politically motivated or charged. It is motivated by a hunter who wants to help other hunters navigate these questions logically and responsibly.
  • An AR-15 can be used effectively for coyotes, foxes, raccoons, woodchucks, and other small to mid size game, even turkeys with the right load.
  • AR-15s can be used to hunt deer under certain conditions I discuss in this episode but an AR-10 would be a better choice for hunting deer, elk, moose, and other large game.
  • I did not cover recoil in this episode. Mostly because I forgot, but also because it is not that big of a variable for most people. I have a bolt action 223 WIN that has less recoil than most AR-15 rifles that I’ve shot. It is really a non issue until you get to AR-10 platform.
    • In this case, the AR-10 would typically have a little less recoil than a manual action 308 WIN rifle of the same weight. But since most AR-10’s tend to weigh more than a conventional bolt action rife, the felt recoil is even more significantly reduced.
    • This is a benefit to those who are small framed, injured, or physically disabled in a way that they could not comfortably fire a traditional rifle due to recoil but could use an AR-10.
    • Reduced recoil could be a reason someone opts to use an AR-15 for deer hunting.

Show Notes:

All animals are edible, but not all animals are tasty or healthy. On today’s episode I help new hunters navigate what common game animals are best to eat, which ones are questionable, and which to avoid.

Take Aways:

Almost anything can be palatable if cooked right, and somethings that are very unhealthy can be tasty. So the below classifications take both health and taste into consideration, it is not just a list of the things I like and don’t like. 

  • Best To Eat: Dear, Elk, Moose, Turkey, Pheasants, Grouse, Doves, Quail, Ducks, Geese, Sheep/Rams/Goats
  • Worth Considering: Squirrel, Rabbit, Wild Boar
  • What To Avoid: Crows, Foxes, Coyotes, Raccoons, Beavers, Muskrats, Martins, Fishers, Opossum’s, Woodchucks, Bob Cats, Bears, Porcupines and essentially anything that is a predator or a scavenger.

In the end, do your own research about health, and your own taste testing so you can come to your own conclusions. These recommendations are just a guide to help new hunters get started.

Show Notes:

The number one thing I have seen turn off new or potential hunters is them being pushed or made to feel like they need to hunt in some hardcore way to be successful or accepted. On today’s episode I shine the spotlight on this false, pride driven, and empty nonsense. And no, I’m not mincing any words! 

Take Aways:

  • You should hunt as often as you want, as long as you want, and the way you want in order to get the most enjoyment from the sport.
  • There is no wrong way to hunt unless it negatively impacts other hunters.
  • Hunting longer, harder, and more often does not make you a better person, and does not make you better than anyone else. It adds nothing to you except fun and experience. 
  • Most people who talk about how hardcore they are, are just blowing smoke, they are exaggerating, lying, or just plain trying to make themselves look good.
  • Those who really do hunt hardcore and still talk a big talk are just full of pride, and trying to make themselves sound impressive.
  • Much hardcore hunting is misguided, not strategic, and rather clumsily planned. You can often get better results by hunting smarter and easier.
  • Maybe 1 in 100 new hunters are interested in hardcore hunting, which means you will prevent 99% of new hunters from ever starting by running your mouth.
  • Do what you enjoy because you enjoy it. If you want to hunt harder then do it because you want to. Don’t let anyone else’s expectations, talk, or pride push you around.
  • New hunters need something that appeals to them, something to make them want to hunt. Don’t try to lift them up to your level, find out where they are and help them there.

 

Show Notes:

A backpack is one of the most important pieces of hunting gear you can buy, you will likely use it hunting all different types of game, with all different types of clothing, firearms, and footwear. A good pack can literally last half a lifetime and go with you many more places than just the woods. On today’s episode I talk about what are the top five things to look for in a good hunting backpack

Take Aways:

  1. Concealment. A good backpack must have reasonable concealment. It should be some combination of camouflage, black, brown, or tan. It needs to blend into the woods well during all seasons and not be something that ever gives you away.
  2. Compartments. The right hunting pack for you should fit your style with the right number and size of compartments. I recommend simple and easy, the fewer pockets you have, the fewer you have to search through in a tree, in the dark, or when every sound and movement matters. But make sure you have a place to easily access a water bottle.
  3. Comfort. The best backpack for you is one you can wear all day. It shouldn’t be too big or too heavy. It should have good padding on the straps and against your back. And there should be strap adjustments as well.
  4. Waterproofing. Ideally your pack will be water resistant or water proof. If it’s not, you need to have a water proof backup plan. I keep a big plastic garbage bag inside mine that I can quickly put the pack inside of when needed.
  5. Cost. When it comes to hunting packs, the sky is the limit for price. But you don’t have to spend hundreds of dollars for a quality pack. The pack that fits you best may not even be a name brand. Set yourself a budget you are comfortable with and find the pack that best meets the above criteria for you. 

Show Notes:

If you spend more than an hour in the woods, there is a good chance you will need a bathroom break. What you are hunting determines the best tactics for relieving yourself. On today’s episode I talk about how and when to use the restroom with the least chance of disrupting your hunt.

Take Aways:

  • Contrary to popular belief, deer are not put off by the scent you leave from relieving yourself, in fact they may find it curious. You are more likely to spook a deer by being seen or heard. So the best option is to go right from your tree stand if possible with minimal movement or noise.
  • Turkeys and most birds can’t really smell, so movement and sound are the only things to concern yourself with.
  • Small game gives you maybe the most flexibility, most of these game animals don’t care much.
  • Predators do care, and you have to play the wind. If the wind is on your side then you have minimal risk using the restroom, if the wind is against you then it can ruin your hunt.  
  • The rule of thumb is anytime you are going to leave an area, use the bathroom then, as opposed to whenever you come into a fresh area.

Show Notes:

When it comes to hunting, there is a ditch on either side of the road. On one side people cannot find enough time to hunt. On the other side, people get out of control and hunt so much that it hurts their family or job. On today’s episode I talk about how to balance hunting and life, and that includes how to make time to hunt as well as set up guardrails for yourself. 

Take Aways:

  • Schedule time off for hunting each year, plan how many days and in what seasons, this will make sure you do it.
  • Schedule a Saturday every month for hunting. Some months this means going into the woods to hunt, other months it means target practice and scouting.
  • Use more of your time off for your family than for hunting.  Make it a point to never let this balance shift towards hunting and away from family.
  • Always schedule and talk about hunting in advance, never be a no show at work.
  • Always be willing to blow off a planned hunting day for something that is more important. Never blow off something more important for hunting.
  • Put first things first, honor what is most important, and you will earn the respect and flexibility you need to hunt.

 

Show Notes:

Hunting is a rich, fulfilling sport. But unlike many sports, it is not as easy to tell who is good at it and who isn’t. This has given rise to a discouraging “everyone is a master in their own mind” mentality that far to many hunters share, from beginners to veterans.  On this episode, we talk about how to navigate that attitude in order to fully enjoy the sport without being subject to the opinions and judgements of others. It might not sound like a big deal, but this episode could be the difference between many newer hunters falling in love with the sport or leaving it discouraged.

Take Aways:

  • Every year people quit the sport or never start because of the pressure, attitudes, or superiority complex of other hunters.  This is crazy.
  • Getting a big buck, a long beard turkey, or an elk are all great pursuits. But taking a little buck, a doe, or even a squirrel can be just as fun, and sometimes more challenging. 
  • Hunting is about fun, it is not a competition, and no one has a right to shame anyone. The only person you can honestly compete with is yourself.
  • Just because someone says or lets on that they are a master means nothing. You would be surprised to know how many self proclaimed masters have never even taken the game they claim to be experts on.
  • Experience is valuable, pride is valueless. 
  • Every way of a man is right in his own eyes – Proverbs 21:2.
  • Expect people to tell you their way is the right way, whether it’s even worked for them or not. Listen to them, but then make your own decision.
  • But they, measuring themselves by themselves, and comparing themselves among themselves, are not wise – 2 Corinthians 10:12.
  • Someone who thinks they are a more skilled hunter or a better person because they took a larger buck than you is plain foolishness. It means nothing, don’t even listen to it.
  • Plenty of successful hunters are miserable bitter people. The only thing they enjoy about taking a trophy is boasting about it. Those types of people are not really successful. If you take a trophy without having fun you are a failure. If you hunt and come back empty handed but had fun, then you are truly successful. 
  • If a person, or a forum, or a magazine put pressure and expectations on you and discourage you then walk away from that. Don’t allow it into your ears. People weave their own realities out of the opinions they surround themselves with. 
  • The best hunters, and the best teachers tend to be the humblest men and women. 
  • Pursue what is fun for you, and seek the company of people who enjoy the sport.
  • Get into the woods and enjoy being there, that means more than anything else!