Show Notes:

The goal of orange gear is to keep you safe in the woods, but it can be a drain on the wallet. On this episode I talk about the most versatile, most cost effective, and most concealing blaze orange strategy for new hunters.

Take Aways:

  • Blaze orange jackets and coats look great, fit great, and work great. But you don’t need to buy half a dozen orange coats so you can comfortably hunt in all weather conditions. 
  • You do not need to end up with a closet full of orange coats that really cannot be used for any other purpose.
  • Sure they make cheap little orange vests but they make noise, look bad, fit bad, cover your pockets, and don’t last long.
  • Solid orange baseball caps create a liability for deer hunting, there are better and equally cheap alternatives.
  • Download and listen to this episode to learn more and get the full blaze orange gear strategy.

 

Show Notes:

There is no shortage of great marketing in the deer hunting industry and it can be difficult to sort out what is useless, what is useful, and what is really needed. On this episode I share 10 items that new hunters do not need to worry about researching, spending money on, or longing for.

Take Aways:

  1. Long range precision rifles. These guns have their place, but new hunters have no need to spend this kind of money on a gun they are unlikely to be able to fully utilize where and how they hunt.
  2. $40 boxes of ammo. Deer are not that hard to take down. All you need is average ammunition for the conditions that most new hunters will encounter. 
  3. Scents and cover scents. New hunters are more likely to use scents to create a problem than a benefit, and there is so much more you can do to improve scent control by simply being careful and thoughtful. Pass on these for the first couple years at least.
  4. Listen to the episode to hear numbers 4-10.

Show Notes:

When it comes to deer hunting, it is critically important for your bullet to deliver a clean and fast kill. The bullet matters for you and for the animal. On this episode I cover the basics of deer hunting bullets and what new hunters need to know.

Take Aways:

There are three major categories of deer bullets.

  • Cup and core bullets make up the majority of the market, and while there are many variations and proprietary features, the general concept is a jacket holds a lead bullet together to control its expansion and penetration. It is a good type of a bullet that will get the job done. The downside may be less power and accuracy at extreme range.
  • Ballistic tips are essentially plastic or polymer tipped and give you a more aerodynamic bullet that delivers more speed, less bullet drop, and better accuracy at long range. If there is a downside, it is that bullet expansion and penetration may vary a lot at short and long rang. The bigger issue is these kinds of bullets may lead hunters to think they are better long range marksmen than they really are…
  • Multi stage bullets have a forward section that provides quick expansion and a rear section that holds together to provide more penetration. These bullets are important and very effective for taking bigger game like elk, bear, or moose. They are generally more than you need for deer but they will of course work well.

 

Show Notes:

Some deer hunting principles are universal and some apply more specifically to the rut. In this episode I share the story of a great hunt and the 5 strategies that enabled me to take a buck this year during the peak rut.

Take Aways:

    1. Location, Location, Location. Almost nothing matters more than where you decide to setup. But the strategies you use all year to judge a good location need to change for the peak rut.
    2. Habitat Improvements. Small efforts that have a small impact on deer movement can have a big pay off come the rut.
    3. Always Mind The Wind. The wind is the friend of those who consider it, and the it is the enemy of everyone else.
    4. Scent Control. Small, free, thoughtful actions can make the difference between a good hunt and empty woods. 
    5. Knowing when to be still and when to move. One wrong move can literally ruin a hunt, and even a whole day. 

 

Show Notes:

Deer calls are very popular and many types exist which can overwhelm a new hunter. This episode does two helpful things, it reassures new hunters that you don’t need any calls to be effective and we cover the four main types of deer calls and when those may be helpful.

Take Aways:

  • Rattle calls mimic the sound of two bucks locking antlers in a fight or sparring match. 
  • Bleet calls mimic the sound a doe makes during the mating season.
  • Snort wheeze calls imitate a challenge that one mature buck may issue to another.
  • Grunt calls try to arouse a deer’s curiosity by letting them know there are unexpected deer over here.
  • Overall, calling is likely to be more of a liability to new hunters than a benefit. I do not recommend you include calls in your hunting strategy.
  • Calling is a risk, it draws attention to the hunter and often arouses suspicion in deer, you need to weigh the pros and cons before doing it.

Show Notes:

The deer attractants, scents, and lore’s industry is enormous and confusing and there are big marketing budgets trying to get your attention.  On today’s episode I talk about the fundamental things new hunters need to know about this subject to be successful.

Take Aways:

  • Remember, there are things deer need, deer like, and deer are intrigued by.
  • The best attractants focus on what deer need and like.
  • The less helpful attractants focus on what intrigue deer.
  • If you can find out what deer must have and use it to your advantage you will have the best chance for success.
  • It is true that bucks are looking for does during the rut. But there is something else they are looking for on those days, and every other day before and after.
  • Remember, the value of an attracting scent can be overridden by the liability of the human scent you leave behind trying to spread it.

 

Show Notes:

Scent control is very important for deer hunting, but it can also be very simple and inexpensive. On this episode I cover five fundamental keys for scent control that are easy for new hunters and important for all hunters to master.

Take Aways:

  • There are a lot of products out there from magic soaps to cover scents to special washing machines and air tight clothing, some of them are helpful but they are no where near as important as these five keys.
  • It’s functionally impossible to eliminate all human and synthetic scent, trying to do so is exhausting. You need to minimize your scent and then be very conscious of where and how you leave scent.
  • The wind is a huge factor, but these five factors are critical no matter what the wind is doing.

Show Notes:

If you only have one vacation day that you can use for deer hunting this year, how can you tell what is the best possible day to take it? On today’s episode I dig right into the largest weather factors that impact deer movement so you can identify the days that give you the highest chance of success.

Take Aways:

  • There are a lot of myths and partial truths when it comes to deer hunting. Don’t believe anything you hear without kicking the tires on it.
  • Any day in woods is a good day, but when you have very few days you can be in the woods, you want them to count as much as possible.
  • You can take a trophy deer on any day during any weather. But your chances can change drastically based on the conditions.
  • If you don’t enjoy hunting in certain weather then don’t. It’s not worth the time, energy, and resources to hunt on a day that makes you miserable
  • Listen to this episode to learn the top two weather factors that impact deer movement and how you can leverage them.

Show Notes:

The best treestand for a new hunter depends on several variables. You might have a strong preference, but knowing which situations call for which treestands will help you improve odds for success and have more fun in the woods. On today’s episode I talk about the three primary types of treestands and when/where they are the best options.

Take Aways:

  • Ladder Stands: These get their name from being integrated with their ladder into one piece. They are the most difficult to assemble and setup, but they are also the sturdiest, most permanent and can afford the most room for people and cargo.
  • Climbing Stands: These stands are basically climbing contraptions that let you inch your way up a tree and then sit using friction to hold you. They are the fastest to put up and the most flexible, but they can be the most difficult to use.
  • Hang-On Stands: These lightweight barebones stands use a simple strap and friction to hang onto a tree. They are light, portable, and are distraction free. They are also free of amenities.
  • Each of these stands has a scenario when they are the best option, and the worst option. Listen to the episode to find out more.

 

Show Notes:

There are a lot of elements that are the same between rifle and bow hunting but there are a few key differences that you must take into account to be successful with archery. On this episode I talk about the two biggest aspects that are critical for archery, and when I say archery I give specifics for both regular bows and crossbows.

Take Aways:

  • Concealment
    • For new archery hunters to successful, it is vital that you have concealment, either in a tree or a hunting blind.
    • Hunting from the ground is extremely difficult with a bow and not recommended as an effective strategy.
    • Get into a tree, nothing beats altitude when it comes to deer hunting. 
    • A hunting blind is a good plan B if you have no good trees or aren’t ready to get off the ground.
  • Range
    • The average crossbow has an effective range of about 50 yards.
    • Regular bows can be accurately shot by the average marksman to about 30 yards.
    • In either event, you want to setup 15-20 yards from where you plan for the deer to be.  
    • Never plan to take shots at your maximum range, even if you can make the shot at the range. The real world ads variables you do not experience at the range and you want some margin.
    • Be careful shooting at targets that are too close because of the steep downward angles needed.