Show Notes:

In many traditions doe hunting has been frowned upon, but the reasons for that simply do not hold up under scrutiny. On this episode I examine and debunk several of the core issues that have held people back from the fun and benefits of hunting whitetail does.

Take Aways

When many people think about deer hunting they think about hunting bucks. Generations of tradition have ingrained this thinking but it is based on several flawed premises:

  • There are not enough whitetail deer in the woods so we need to save the herd by saving the does – False
  • If it wasn’t for people, there would be more deer in the woods – False
  • There are not enough bucks or not enough big bucks, if we pass on does then there will be more bucks – False
  • When they allocate doe tags, the game commission is telling us how many does the herd can survive without – False
  • Does are too easy to hunt and they are not sporting game – False
  • Does do not have enough meat on them to be worth taking – False
  • Does are not fun to hunt – False
  • Does are not trophies – False

Listen to the episode to hear how many of these anti-doe hunting myths are easily debunked.

 

Show Notes:

A trail camera is more than a tool, it is a hobby, a pursuit, and one of the most fun parts of hunting during the off season. On this episode I talk about the best things trail cameras can do for you to improve your deer hunt and your overall experience as an outdoorsman.

Take Aways

  • There are two major categories of benefits for game cameras, enjoyment and intelligence. You are using the camera to improve your hunt or to have fun, or both.
  • Game cameras do cost money, but they are the only peace of hunting gear you can enjoy year-round.
  • When it comes to trail cameras there are two most important features. No-glow or low-glow nighttime bulbs and warrantee.
  • An infra-red flash or white light nighttime flash will spook game and cause problems. Avoid these cheaper camera types.
  • The number one issue with trail cameras is that they break, deteriorate, and just don’t last more than a couple years. Having a good warrantee both assures that the camera will perform for a minimum amount of time and that the overall function of the camera will be good.
  • Companies do not put good warrantees on junk cameras. If the warrantee is good, you can assume the technical specs of the camera will be good enough as well.

Show Notes:

You do not need to have hundreds of acres to have a great hunt. In fact you can hunt whitetail deer very successfully on small properties, even those with as few as just a couple acres. On this episode I talk about how to amplify your deer hunting success when you have limited amounts of land available.

Take Aways

  • An acre is about 208′ x 208′ that is all the space you need to hunt with a bow or a rifle, IF you can get the deer into that space.
  • Contrary to popular belief, anything under about 1,500 acres is a “small” property because it does not encompass the 24 hours a day, 365 days a year life of a deer. So if you have less land than that, you need some to have some small parcel strategies in play.
  • A property does not need to contain everything deer need to survive and thrive, in fact, you only need one thing, a reason for them to walk across your land.
  • Do not focus on what you lack, focus on what you have or can affect.
  • Do not worry about what your neighbors have, in fact use what your neighbors have to your advantage.
  • Only about 5% of whitetail deer properties are managed well enough to be a day time buck herd influencer.
  • You can be smarter than most of the people around you, even if they have better land and more resources.

 

Show Notes:

With modern day broadheads it is hard to go wrong in what you select, but certain types of broadheads may be better for certain kinds of whitetail deer hunting and for new hunters. On this episode I talk about the different types of broadheads and the factors that go into making the best decision of what you should get started with.

Take Aways

  • Field Tips. These are rounded or pointed practice arrow heads, not usable for hunting but they work great on a target.
  • Fixed Position Broadheads. These are your standard firm configuration, the modern titanium equivalent to the stone arrow heads used in ancient times.
  • Mechanical Broadheads. These look like a field tip but the blades expand out on impact with the target.
  • Hybrid Broadheads. These have moderate fixed blades with expanded blades that pop out on impact.
  • Each type of broadhead has pros and cons. Listen to the episode to sort through those factors to pick the one that is best for you.

Show Notes:

Few things are more exciting than taking a buck after a lot of hard work and weeks of expectation. What you do next with that trophy should be something you have already considered and planned out, not something you jump into with while overcome with emotion. On this episode I dig into what you need to think about and plan for so that when you do take a great deer your next steps can be informed, thoughtful, and hopefully not a huge waste of money.

Take Aways

  • Mounting the head and neck of a deer is expensive, takes up a lot of space, and is a process. It is not a decision to make spur of the moment.
  • If you wait until you have a deer on the ground before considering these things you will very likely do something you regret later. Adrenaline, excitement, and fatigue can prompt you to do all kinds of things.
  • There are many easier and simpler ways to turn your buck into a trophy that you can be thrilled with for decades to come.
  • Most new hunters would be served best with a whitetail or turkey mount that is easy and inexpensive like these:


 

Show Notes:

A lot of people think food plots are beyond what they can achieve or afford. But there are great options out there you can start with, such as white clover that can be planted with no equipment, needs minimal space, and grows back every year. On this episode I dig into the details of getting started on cheap, fast, and easy clover plots.

Take Aways

  • The best times of the year to plant clover are early spring and late summer, either of which can help impact your whitetail deer or turkey hunting success.
  • You do not need to till the ground to plant clover, in fact there are good reasons not to till.
  • You can plant a half acre or less plot with the best white clover seed on planet earth for less than $30.
  • Clover is roughly 30% protein and is loved by deer and turkey. Bonus fact, it can double as a survival food for humans if you boil it before eating.
  • Clover grows back every year, which means once you get the plot established, all you need to do is maintain it and it can last for years and years.
  • Planting can be fun, it can even become its own off season side hobby like hunting for antler sheds.
  • Listen to the episode to hear the full story! 

 

Show Notes:

The mock scrape and trail camera combination may be the single most powerful reconnaissance strategy for hunting whitetails that there is, at least for new hunters. On this episode I talk about the best time of year to get out there and setup mock scrapes and trail cameras, both for archery and rifle season.

Take Aways

  • Mock scrapes are great because they focus deer movement for a variety of reasons and they are essentially free.
    • For the cost of some string you can increase your chances of seeing whitetails on camera and in front of your hunting setup.
  • The best way to make good use of a trail camera is to assume it is terrible and will only get photos of what is directly in front of it.
    • If you have a better detection cone then great, but don’t count on it.
  • Setting up scrapes and cameras and checking them, going through the photos, and being outside in the summer can be almost as much fun as hunting. Enjoy every aspect of the hunt.
  • Remember deer often change their habits and locations between summer and late fall.
    • As the cover and food sources change, so do their travel and bedding areas.
    • Do not rely on scouting or camera data that is months old to determine where you hunt.
    • Regularly check trail cameras between August 1 and when you plan to hunt. I recommend every 2 weeks.
  • Stay out of the woods a couple weeks before hunting season starts, let the woods rest from human scent and interference.
  • Listen to this episode to find the best time of year to setup mock scrapes and trail cameras for whitetail deer hunting.

 

Show Notes:

There are seven things every hunter needs to know about how to locate, assess, and improve deer habitat to have consistent success in the woods. On this episode I talk about what you can do right now to understand whitetail habitat, find it in the woods, and make adjustments to it to better your chances of success.

Take Aways

  • When deer move they move for a purpose, the more you understand those purposes the better you can hunt.
  • Every deer needs certain things, you need to find or provide them to have good deer movement.
  • People’s intuition is often different from a deer’s intuition. You need to learn how they think.
  • It does not take alot of time or money to improve deer habitat, there is alot you can do at little to no cost.
  • Listen to this episode to hear the 7 basics.

 

Show Notes:

Both sectional density and ballistic coefficient are bullet specifications that matter for hunters but one matters a lot more for new hunters. On this episode I break down the need to know fundamentals of each so you can make better ammunition decisions.

Sectional Density:

  • Is one of the most obscure pieces of information printed on a box of ammo.
  • Is a complicated math calculation that you will likely never need to preform.
  • Is something you can understand quickly and easily and can help you from today onward.
  • Is a very important number for telling the ideal use of a bullet if you want to make decisions based on more than marketing.
  • To best understand the meaning of sectional density you need to understand what makes bullets effective on whitetail deer, elk, moose, and other big game.
  • All of this and more is covered in the episode.

Ballistic Coefficient:

  • Is one of the more popular peieces of bullet marketing.
  • Involves more math than is even worth mentioning.
  • Matters a lot for a small number of hunters.
  • Is easy to understand but less easy to apply.
  • Can make the difference between a terrible bullet and a great bullet at certain ranges.
  • All of this and more is covered in the episode.

 

Show Notes:

Are AR style rifles good for hunting? Should you hunt with one? Should new hunters use one? This is a hotly debated topic where opinions tend to overshadow facts. On this episode I talk about the pros and the cons without ranting or raving about either position.

Take Aways:

  • I cover both AR-15 rifles and AR-10 rifles because they are the most common.
  • I am familiar with the term “modern sporting rifle” but I’ve opted not to use it in this episode. It is not because I dislike the term but only a percentage of listeners would be familiar with it, so I’ve gone with the more familiar terms. No hate mail please.
  • Are there good reasons to hunt with an AR? Yes.
  • Are there good reason not to hunt with an AR? Yes.
  • Should you hunt with one? Maybe. You need to examine the pros and cons and YOUR situation to answer that question for yourself.
  • The answer an experienced hunter comes to and the answer a beginner comes to may be different however.
  • This episode is not politically motivated or charged. It is motivated by a hunter who wants to help other hunters navigate these questions logically and responsibly.
  • An AR-15 can be used effectively for coyotes, foxes, raccoons, woodchucks, and other small to mid size game, even turkeys with the right load.
  • AR-15s can be used to hunt deer under certain conditions I discuss in this episode but an AR-10 would be a better choice for hunting deer, elk, moose, and other large game.
  • I did not cover recoil in this episode. Mostly because I forgot, but also because it is not that big of a variable for most people. I have a bolt action 223 WIN that has less recoil than most AR-15 rifles that I’ve shot. It is really a non issue until you get to AR-10 platform.
    • In this case, the AR-10 would typically have a little less recoil than a manual action 308 WIN rifle of the same weight. But since most AR-10’s tend to weigh more than a conventional bolt action rife, the felt recoil is even more significantly reduced.
    • This is a benefit to those who are small framed, injured, or physically disabled in a way that they could not comfortably fire a traditional rifle due to recoil but could use an AR-10.
    • Reduced recoil could be a reason someone opts to use an AR-15 for deer hunting.